Recipes

Can You Go In A Lazy Spa When Pregnant

Can You Go In A Lazy Spa When Pregnant
Can You Go In A Lazy Spa When Pregnant

Can You Go In A Lazy Spa When Pregnant: Taking a soak in a hot tub may be the most relaxing thing you can do to unwind. Warm water is well-known for its ability to relax muscles. The fact that hot tubs are meant for more than one person means that soaking in one may be a wonderful way to spend quality time with your spouse or with friends.

Hot baths, on the other hand, should only be used with caution or avoided entirely during pregnancy. According to a reliable source, the water temperature in the hot tub should never surpass 104°F (40°C). Being submerged in hot water for an extended period of time can quickly raise your body temperature, causing health problems for both you and your growing child.

The use of hot tubs during pregnancy has been linked to a number of major health issues. The general view is that they should only be taken sparingly and for short periods of time, if at all, and that they should be avoided altogether. A bath, hot springs, or hot tub are all examples of places where sitting in water that is warmer than your body temperature can elevate your temperature.

Can You Go In A Lazy Spa When Pregnant
Can You Go In A Lazy Spa When Pregnant

During pregnancy, your body temperature should not increase above 102.2 degrees Fahrenheit (39 degrees Celsius). If you spend more than 10 minutes in a hot tub with a water temperature of 104°F (40°C), you run the risk of developing a heat stroke. Not at all. When you are not required to take cold showers while pregnant, it is usually a good idea to avoid using the hot tub and sauna while you are expecting. While spending time in a sauna or bathing in a hot tub may seem like the ideal way to alleviate pregnancy-related aches and pains, both activities are potentially dangerous.

First and foremost, pregnant women are at an increased risk of dehydration, dizziness, and low blood pressure in general, and these symptoms may become more severe under high heat conditions. Furthermore, anything that causes your core body temperature to rise beyond 101 degrees Fahrenheit and remains there for an extended period of time is potentially harmful to your unborn child, particularly during the early months of pregnancy, when your child’s body and brain are still growing.

The chance of neural tube abnormalities of the brain, spine, or spinal cord during the first month of pregnancy has been shown to rise with exposure to high temperatures. This includes spina bifida, which is a birth disease that happens when a baby’s backbone does not completely seal as it grows.

The increased temperature during the first trimester may result in birth problems such as brain and spinal cord disorders, making this precaution even more critical. According to a 2006 study published in the journal Birth Abnormalities Research: Trusted Source, modest exposure before the embryo is placed in the uterus and more severe exposure during the first trimester may result in a variety of birth defects and even the loss of the pregnancy.

Can You Go In A Lazy Spa When Pregnant
Can You Go In A Lazy Spa When Pregnant

When it comes to using the hot tub while pregnant, Trusted Source warns that there are certain hazards, particularly during the first trimester. It’s a good idea to consult with your doctor before using a hot tub during your first trimester of pregnancy.

Another issue to consider while using a hot tub while pregnant is the possibility of contracting germs. The warm, small body of water may serve as a breeding ground for germs that are dangerous to humans. Regular maintenance and frequent monitoring, on the other hand, may assist in ensuring that the water chemistry is appropriately balanced.

If you possess a hot tub, make sure you apply the proper disinfectant and test the water with pool water strips before using it. Free chlorine levels should be between 2 and 4 parts per million (ppm) of a trusted source, and bromine levels should be between 4 and 6 parts per million (ppm) of a trusted source if bromine is being used. According to a reliable source, the pH level should be between 7.2 and 7.8.

Alternatively, if you do not own the hot tub but want some peace of mind, test the water or request that the facility’s management guarantee that the water is tested on a regular basis.