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Author Of Darkness At Noon

Author Of Darkness At Noon
Author Of Darkness At Noon

Author Of Darkness At Noon: Darkness at Noon is a novel written by British novelist Arthur Koestler, who was born in Hungary and raised in England. It was first published in 1940. It tells the story of Rubashov, an Old Bolshevik who is captured, imprisoned, and prosecuted for treason against the government that he helped to establish. It is his best-known book.

The novel takes place in 1939, amid the Stalinist Great Purge and the Moscow Show Trials, and is set in Moscow. In spite of the fact that the novel is based on historical events, neither Russia nor the Soviet Union is mentioned, and generic terms are used to describe people and organizations: for example, the Soviet government is referred to as “the Party,” and Nazi Germany is referred to as “the Dictatorship.”

“Number One,” a scary tyrant, is used to portray Joseph Stalin. At the onset of World War II, the novel reveals the author’s disenchantment with the Bolshevik ideology of the Soviet Union, as expressed in the novel.

Despite the fact that Darkness at Noon was written in German, the Modern Library placed it as the eighth-best novel of the twentieth century on its list of the 100 finest English-language novels of the century.

Arthur Koestler’s dystopian condemnation of Stalinism, Darkness at Noon (first published in 1940), was heralded as a major work when it was published in 1940. Former Soviet revolutionary Vladimir Nabokov is caught and tried for treason by the dictatorship he helped to form in this best-selling novel, which George Orwell hailed as “a piece of superb fiction.”

Author Of Darkness At Noon
Author Of Darkness At Noon

As a result, it is widely regarded as one of the works that first brought the realities of Stalin’s government to the attention of the western world, and it is also considered to be one of the most acclaimed political novels of the twentieth century.

A German student recently unearthed a carbon copy of the author’s original text, which had been missing since 1940, and it is now being published in English for the first time nearly 80 years after it was written by the Hungarian-British author.

At the height of Stalin’s purges in 1938, Koestler withdrew from the Communist Party because he had become disillusioned with the party’s leadership. According to George Orwell’s review of Darkness at Noon for the New Statesman in 1941, “as brilliant as this book is as a novel, and as a piece of prison literature,” “it is probably most valuable as an interpretation of the Moscow ‘confessions’ by someone with an inner knowledge of totalitarian methods,” he said.

Darkness at Noon was written by Koestler as the second installment in a trilogy; the first volume, The Gladiators (1939), was first published in Hungarian. It was a novel about the subversion of the Spartacus insurrection, and it was published in 1902. Arrival and Departure (1943), a story about a refugee during World War II, was the author’s third novel. After the original German version of that novel was lost, Koestler, who was by then a resident of London, rewrote it in English for publication. [a citation is required]

Author Of Darkness At Noon
Author Of Darkness At Noon